Useful Resources on Dachshunds | Dachshund Rescue Australia
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Resources

Useful articles, groups and links for current and prospective owners

FAQs

 

Before applying to adopt a dachshund or buying a dachshund from a registered breeder, PLEASE read the below:

Thinking about being owned by a dachshund? Read this first!

Owning A Dachshund

  • Whilst they are a wonderful breed to own they do come with challenges which every newcomer to the breed should take into mind before buying that ‘cute’ puppy.There is a high chance that a dachshund can suffer from IVDD/paralysis during their lifetime.  With one in four dachshunds going down in the back and surgery costing upwards of $7000 it is a consideration that you need to research and decide if your lifestyle and home makes a dachshund the right breed for you.  For more information on this click the link below.(Link to IVDD article).Dachshunds may be low dogs but they can reach high decibels! Sometimes it can seem as though they are barking just to make sure they still can.  Boredom, loneliness, people walking past the gate, trying to get your attention, alerting you to a stranger coming to the house.They are a hound dog.  They follow their nose, they hunt, they can go after chooks and guinea pigs and if they catch them can kill them.  Yes they do love to cuddle up on the couch with you and love sunbathing, but they require daily exercise to prevent them getting bored and becoming destructive.They suffer separation anxiety.  Wherever you are a dachshund wants to be with you, pick up the car keys and they’re the first ones in the car believing it is their right to be with you at all times.They can be very selective about which other dogs they like and dislike although they generally love their own breed.They can be hard to housetrain and some dachshunds just don’t do rain and wet paws.

Buying A Puppy

It is recommended that puppies stay with their mother and litter mates until around 11 weeks old.  At this stage Mum has started to pull away from her puppies and they are finding their independence.

 

Make sure you see both parents in a home environment so that you can see the puppy interacting with its siblings and parents.  Are you buying from a registered breeder, a puppy farm or a backyard breeder?  See the link below for the difference.

 

 

Is the colour of the dachshund a recognized colour?

 

Has the puppy had the appropriate health testings, i.e. Lafora or PRA.  Do you know the health/breeding background of the parents.

 

REGISTERED BREEDER

A registered breeder will breed for the betterment of the breed striving to produce dachshunds that meet the breed standard. They are members of an organized governing body that supervises their activities with strict rules and regulations. They study pedigrees, genetics and soundness of the breed keeping accounts of the history and pedigree of their dogs so that defects can be readily traced and eliminated from the gene pool. They will regularly attend dog shows and subject their dogs to the scrutiny of experienced judges. Registered breeders have waiting lists for their puppies and will rarely sell over the internet and never to pet shops, they are also very happy for you to visit them, view the parents and freely offer advice on housetraining, socialisation and behaviour and chat in depth about the breed. Their reputation sells their puppies for them and they are the custodians of the breed. Their puppies will be microchipped, regularly wormed and up to date with their vaccinations. However as in all associations there are good and bad, the same way there are good vet and bad vets. We recommend you do your research.  Contact the dachshund club in your State and discuss with them any questions and a list of registered breeders.  For a full list of registered breeders around Australia www.dogzonline.com.au

BACKYARD BREEDERS

This falls into two categories – the owner of a pet dachshund who has not had their dog desexed and “accidentally” finds their dachshund pregnant, or who actively seeks another dachshund to mate with their dachshund. The problem with this type of mating as it is rare for them to know what they’re doing with regard to testing for genetic problems common in the breed and nor are the dachshunds mated, necessarily a good example of the breed. They think they own a purebred dachshund so their pups will be purebred. but as a result of not researching the genetics or pedigree, they are unaware of any culprits hiding in the gene pool. It will be something of a gamble as to how the pups will turn out. Although it could be argued that back in the day everyone was having litters at home; but at what risk?   Now that so much more has been done with genetics and testing for PRA cord 1 blindness, there is no excuse for not keeping up with research.

The other backyard breeder is one who breeds for profit and you will regularly find their adverts on Gumtree or the Trading Post. Their dogs do not necessarily receive good care, either veterinary or welfare. They are unlikely to have any track record of show or breeding success and quite likely have no knowledge about the breed standard. A dachshund is a dachshund and it’s about the dollars.

 

PUPPY FARMERS

This is an intensive breeding establishment that generally completely fails to meet any social, behavioural or veterinary needs of their dogs. They are quite often kept in cages and the bitches are continually bred with and absolutely no regard to their health or welfare. Puppies are sold over the internet and via the internet and they invariably have great looking websites.

 

GUMTREE

Buyer Beware.  There are many stories about puppies on Gumtree and we are regularly contacted by members of the public about their own story with regards to buying a puppy from this source.  A synopsis from one such member of the public is below.

We found a mini dachshund puppy being advertised by a “breeder” on Gumtree.  Although the puppy was advertised as $500, on ringing the lady it transpired the full price was $1200.  The first warning bell should have been that she was insisting that full payment be made up front without seeing either the puppy or having an address where this puppy was located and further the bank details did not match the name of the breeder. On the scheduled day of collection, the pick up point was changed twice.   However, the meeting did go ahead and the family drove home with her.  However the puppy was extremely quiet and lethargic and when they got her home and put her on the grass she was stumbling and staggering.   She was taken straight to their vet who gave her extensive tests and she was given pain relief/anti inflammatories in the hope that the symptoms might have been less sinister than the vet thought.  The parents and children were sent home without her as their vet did not want them forming any further attachments to this little puppy.  Whilst hoping for a miracle overnight, it was not to be and she was sadly put to sleep.  Contact with the breeder has proved futile.

As this mother says she is enraged that this breeder could knowingly keep and then sell such a sick puppy which was also in incredible pain.  The children are devastated and their bank account in the space of 24 hours reached over $2000.  The breeder continues to sell her puppies on Gumtree.

I Want To Breed My Dog

I’ve Got A Puppy, Now What?

My puppy came home and cries all night in the kitchen.  Remember that your puppy has just left the comfort of its mother and siblings and to suddenly find itself all alone it is frightened, lonely and doesn’t understand why there is now no one around.

 

It wees and poos everywhere.  Puppies do not housetrain themselves, you have to be around to give full attention to housetraining.  Every time they wake up, feed or have finished playing,  take them out into the garden and give them lots of praise when they perform.  Puppies have small bladders and will rarely go through the night without needing to relieve themselves, so be prepared to be woken up at night in order to take them out.  Do not tell your puppy off for soiling the house, it is not their fault and by reprimanding them they could then become anxious over the act and may try and hide it from you.

 

They chew everything in sight.  Yes they’re puppies and they will.

 

Should I go to puppy classes?  This is an important part of learning their socialization skills and is highly recommended.  However, good puppy classes are those that separate the puppies by sizes.  A Labrador puppy is much bigger than a dachshund puppy and if they’re allowed to bounce all over a dachshund and you see your dachshund puppy is terrified of it, this is not a good memory for your puppy to have.  Socialisation skills should all be positive at this stage so that your dachshund doesn’t grow up terrified of big dogs.  If you have a friend with a gentle dog then ask them to come round so your puppy can play in a controlled environment and make it a positive experience for your puppy.

 

Train your dachshund, they are an intelligent breed and love to show off their skills.

Rare / Exotic Colours

If the dachshund is being advertised as a ‘rare’ colour and is double the price of dachshund puppies, then it usually means you are being ripped off and the dachshund comes with a lot of health issues.

 

Here is a link to coats and colours on the Dachshund Breed council website.

 

https://dachshundbreedcouncil.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/coat-and-colour.pdf

 

 

Blue

Blue Dachshunds are not registered or recognised is this country.  Generally speaking if a dachshund is being advertised as rare and you can visibly see it is blue/grey in colour it has probably come from a puppy farmer who is trying to make bucks out of the public.

Whilst the blues can look pretty, bear in mind that not only are you doing a diservice to bettering the breed, but at a later stage in their development they are likely to have skin issues, reactions to food and sunlight and can end up with boils on the body.

 

Double dapples

Double dapples have all sorts of problems including being blind and deaf.  There are increasing numbers of double dapples these days due to people breeding from their dachshund who have no idea of genetics.  This is an excellent page with information and help on double dapples.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/double.dapple.dachshund/

Dachshund Health: IVDD & Back Problems

With as many as 1 in 4 dachshunds suffering from an episode of IVDD during their lifetime, it is important to make yourself aware of the signs and symptoms, which specialist IVDD surgeons and how to act in an emergency.

Put simply IVDD is when the jelly like content of the discs between the veterbra, squeezes out and presses on nerves causing severe pain and damage.  Action should be taken immediately to prevent further damage and permanent paralyses.

Some, but not all of the symptoms, are

Crying when eating or drinking

Yelping when moved and muscle spasm

Shaking/trembling

Hunched appearance and a tense abdomen

Wobbly walking, paws knuckled, legs crossed or dragging.

If your dachshund is showing any of these signs then immediately restrict movement and confining them to a crate.

Get your dachshund to the vet quickly as you cannot diagnose it yourself.  An X ray is not enough to identify what is happening to their discs and they need an MRI.  If your vet is unaware of IVDD then ask for a referral to a specialist animal hospital.

Many dogs can be treated conservatively with extended crate rest for up to 8 weeks.  However, it is vitally important to get your dachshund to the vets within the first 24 hours.

For more information on IVDD visit https://www.dachshund-ivdd.uk/

 

 

For dachshunds in W.A

Canine Restoration   Therapeutic massage for dogs with mobility issues. Specialising in dachshunds and IVDD.

Holistic treatment to support the health and recovery of dachshunds pre- and -post operatively for various conditions and during crate rest if undergoing conservative treatment for IVDD Also Red Light Therapy and equipment hire of strollers , crates, slings, red light premium pads.

Short and long term care and support available , and a more comprehensive care system coming soon.

If you need help, whether advice or in management please do contact. If I cannot help I probably know someone who can !

Penny Hodgson 0449 191962

Pennyhodgson@bigpond.com

www.canine-restoration.com.au

#canineretoration

 

Need to be referred for a specialist opinion?

Ask your vet to refer to:

Rivergum Referral Services

Willetton WA 6155

(08) 9259 6344

 

PVS ( Perth Veterinary Specialists)

Osborne Park WA 6017

(08)9204 0400

 

The Animal Hospital at Murdoch

Murdoch

1300 652494

24/7 emergency number

 

Waves

Success WA 6164

08 9412 5700

24/7 emergency number

Dachshund Health: Desexing Your Dachshund

Welcoming a new dachshund to your home (whether they be young or old) is a very exciting time. You have adopted a new best friend, someone who will be there with you during the good times and the bad times. Someone who will make you smile and who will make you cry (with laughter of course!). Your dachshund will depend on you to care for them and make the best decisions for their happiness and well being. These decisions will come in many forms and you may find yourself asking the following questions:

 

* Should I feed my dachshund a well- balanced diet for dogs as opposed to giving in to the ‘quarter pounder with cheese eyes’ they are giving me?

 

* Should I buy them a ramp for the household stairs?

 

* Should I get my dachshund desexed?

 

The answer to all 3, is a simple ‘yes’. In this article we would like to help you in making the decision to have your dachshund desexed. At DRA, we strongly recommend all breeds of dogs should be desexed, for many reasons. It is because of these reasons we ensure all of the dachshunds who come in to our care are desexed prior to being rehomed.

 

What are the benefits to having my dachshund desexed?

 

*Overpopulation

While most people associate sterilisation with the prevention of unwanted litters, this is only one of the three important reasons to have your dachshund desexed. Each year there are thousands upon thousands of animals euthanised across Australia, due to overpopulation and unwanted animals entering animal shelters. To put a stop to this, we need to stop it at the source and have our pets desexed.

 

*Health Benefits

Making the decision to have your dachshund desexed is one of the best things you can do for their well being. There are health benefits (current and future) for both male and female dachshunds.

 

Firstly, having your male dachshund desexed will remove any chance of them developing testicular cancer, reduces the chance of developing perianal tumours AND decreases prostate problems.

 

As for female dachshunds, having your dachshund desexed will remove any chance of them developing ovarian and uterine cancer, reduces the risk of mammary tumours AND prevents nasty conditions, such as pyometra (infection of the uterus) which can be fatal.

 

Scientific studies have proven that desexed pets live longer and healthier lives.

 

* Behavioural

Lastly, having your dachshund desexed can help prevent and/or control any unwanted behaviours (if sterilisation is performed before these can be ‘learnt’).

 

Undesexed male dogs have so many sexual hormones rushing through their bodies that they can become aggressive (towards humans and animals), territorial (urine marking and/or aggression), and are more likely to escape yards in order to find a female. These characteristics are extremely difficult to stop with training alone. Therefore desexing is highly recommended by all pet health professionals.

 

In undesexed females the need to ‘wander’ and find a mate during heat cycles is removed.

 

While not proven, something to consider is the high popularity of dachshunds in recent years may have led to more being stolen. A desexed dachshund who cannot be used for backyard breeding purposes is much less tempting than an ‘entire’ dachshund.

 

When should I have my dachshund desexed?

It is recommended that you have your dog desexed just prior to, or at sexual maturity. Sexual maturity in dogs begins around 6 months of age. Following this guideline will significantly reduce the likelihood of the ‘learnt behaviours’ discussed previously. This age can differ for individual cases, so it is best to discuss with your vet, when the most appropriate age for your dachshund is. The idea that your female dog should have one litter prior to being desexed is a myth. In fact, every heat cycle your dachshund has increases her chances of developing mammary cancer. If your dachshund has sneakily come on heat before you can desex her, it is best to wait 3-4 weeks after she has finished bleeding, as she is at a higher surgical risk due to the higher volume of blood and enlargement of blood vessels in the area at the time. Remember to separate her from any entire males during this time).

 

 

How is the surgery performed?

The desexing procedure in a male is very straightforward. Your vet will make a small incision, remove the testes (the source of sperm and testosterone), and suture the wound.

 

The desexing procedure in a female is an ovariohysterectomy. Your vet will make an incision, remove both the ovaries and uterus, and suture the wound.

 

The big day

On the day of your dachshunds surgery they will be required to have been fasted since dinner the night before. This prevents them regurgitating while under general anaesthetic. If this occurs, they are at high risk of inhaling it causing pneaumonia. It is fine to give your dachshund dinner before 10pm, and provide water throughout the night, but ensure it is taken away when you wake up in the morning. The lack of breakfast alone may disgust your dachshund, but it is for their own safety.

 

Upon admission the veterinary staff may ask you the following:

 

* Confirmation of your dachshunds details (age etc)

 

* Confirmation of your details (phone number, address, best time to call to discuss discharge times)

 

* What time was your dachshunds last meal?

 

* Is your female dachshund on heat or is there a possibility of her being pregnant?

 

* Have both of your male dachshunds testicles descended?

 

* Is your dachshund on any medications? (This is a great chance for you to discuss any health issues concerning you prior to surgery). There are no ‘silly’ questions, believe us, we want to be as aware of your dachshunds history as possible.

 

* Does your dachshund require any further procedures during their stay? (Vaccinations, microchipping, nail clip and ear clean – all are much easier while your dachshund is anaesthetised).

 

Once your dachshund is admitted to hospital pre anaesthetic protocols are completed. These may include pre anaesthetic blood testing (a blood panel to ensure your dachshunds liver and kidneys are at optimal health and can metabolise the anaesthetic – a MUST for dachshunds over 5 years old, vitals assessment (heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, mucous membranes and capillary refill time checks, eyes/ears/nose/mouth checks and ‘on heat’ or descended testicle checks.

 

When your vet is satisfied that your dachshund is fit and health, they will administer a ‘pre medication’ which is generally a mixture of both a sedative and pain relief. This will help your dachshund to relax, think happy thoughts and have a good sleep prior to surgery.

 

As soon as your dachshund is relaxed and the sedation has had time to work its magic your vet can begin surgery.

 

The thought of your dachshund undergoing surgery can be frightening, but rest assured knowing your dachshund is in the hands of trusted professionals using safe anaesthetics (much like human medicine). During surgery your dachshund will be intubated to ensure a constant supply of anaesthetic and oxygen are provided, a catheter will be placed in order to administer intravenous fluid therapy (this can be an ‘extra’ at some veterinary hospitals and is highly recommended as fluid therapy helps to keep blood pressure from dropping and helps ‘flush’ out the anaesthetic post surgery). Your dachshund will have anaesthetic monitoring equipment (nurse included) to monitor your dachshund during and after the anaesthetic, and they will receive further pain relief to keep them as comfortable as possible.

 

When your dachshund wakes up they will feel like they are floating on a warm cloud made of marshmallows (mmmmm marshmallows on an empty stomach uh oh). But, have no fear, they are snuggled up to a recovery nurse, wrapped in a cosy blanket with a hot water bottle.

 

After your dachshund is fully awake, you will receive the phone call you have been waiting for since you stepped foot out of the hospital – The discharge appointment call!

 

How do I care for my dachshund post surgery?

During your dacshunds discharge appointment your vet will discuss all appropriate post operative care instructions. These may include:

 

* Keep your dachshund in a quiet area tonight as they may be groggy. No playing, jumping or running as we dont want their sutures/wound to stretch. You should reduce exercise until 10 days post op.

 

* Keep your dachshund warm that night. Anaesthetics drop the body temperature and there isn’t a lot to a dachshund to begin with!

 

* Provide small amounts of food. Too much food can result in an upset stomach. Don’t stress if they arent hungry that night. If they are not eating after 24 hours (very abnormal for a dachshund!), call your vet.

 

* Follow all medication instructions exactly.

 

*Do not allow your dachshund to lick at their wound. This will cause an infection. Your dachshund will be sentenced to the ‘cone of shame’.

 

* Depending on the sutures used (dissolvable/ non dissolvable), organise a suture removal appointment.

 

* Organise a recheck appointment 3-5 days post surgery to ensure your dacshunds wound is healing correctly.

Myths of the ‘snip’

 

* Desexing my dachshund will make them lazy and fat.

Oh my! Trust us when we say removing your dacshunds reproductive organs does not give them a hankering for midnight runs to KFC. Removing a male dachshunds testicles cease the production of the hormone testosterone, which is the main cause of undesirable behaviour (humping and/or jumping fences ect), so without these hormones pumping through his system, he should stop being aggressive, or on edge. Much like in humans, stress is exhausting and can burn calories. If your dachshunds exercise regime is maintained, they should not gain any weight.

 

* But my male dachshund wont feel like a ‘man!’

Our dachshunds are so included in our lives that we often forget that they are not one of us- they are animals. There is no evidence to prove that dogs feel ‘deprived’ of their masculinity following castration.

 

* My dachshund may lose their ‘personality’

The majority of owners report that desexing their dachshund had a positive outcome for both owner and dachshund. High levels of hormones surging through your body can cause havoc. Think of desexing your dachshund as a fast forward through the ‘terrifying teenage years’. Except that in an undesexed dachshund these years make up most of their lives.

Dachshund Health: Vaccinations And Your Dachshund

Being a dachshund parent brings many responsibilities in the preventative care and wellbeing of your dachshund. Vaccinations and owning a dachshund go hand in hand. If you have reason to believe that your dachshund does not need a vaccination, you should consult your veterinarian to ensure that you are making the right choice for your dachshund and other dogs they come in to contact with.

 

 

What are vaccines, and how will they protect my dachshund?

Vaccines are man made health products which stimulate an active immune response in your dachshund, to protecthem against multiple diseases and virus’, which if contracted can quickly become fatal. Vaccines contain a modified (killed or alive) infectious agent. Following vaccination your dachshund will produce anti bodies which, along with white blood cells, attack and kill the infectious agent. Post (adequate) vaccination protocol your dachshunds system will remember this process.

The reduced number of dogs contracting these diseases and virus’ following the introduction of these vaccinations proves that they are effective and have had a huge impact on animal health worldwide.

Scarily these diseases and virus’ are evident in every community laying dormant, but having your dachshund vaccinated prepares them for these exposures and can lessen the severity of the illness or prevent infection all together. The more dogs vaccinated, the less these highly contagious diseases can be spread.

 

 

Why should I have my dachshund vaccinated?

Complete vaccination protocols have seen a dramatic reduction in pets suffering from these illness’. Vaccinations are a necessary and a vital part of your dachshunds preventative health program. It is a common misconception that following just one single vaccination your dachshund will be protected for life. This is NOT true. Your dachshunds immunity to these illnesses will weaken over time, therefore ‘booster’ vaccinations are required for your dachshund to maintain protection against these highly contagious illnesses. They are a cost effective way of protecting your dachshund from very expensive treatments and what can be a fatal illness.

While you may feel as though your area is ‘safe’ from these diseases, they are highly contagious, easily spread and can survive in the environment for many years. All it would take is an infected dog to pass by and your dachshund is at risk (infected dogs can take up to 2 weeks to show any clinical signs!).

As viruses can change over time this requires the need for vaccines to be altered to battle these changes as well- another reason why up to date vaccination scheduling is so important.

 

How often does my dachshund need to be vaccinated?

When your dachshund was born, their mother’s milk provided them with maternal anti bodies which help protect the puppies from contracting viruses. This is one of the reasons puppies are not vaccinated immediately. These anti bodies, if present when vaccinated, can ‘cancel out’ the vaccination even at low levels which is unfortunately why there are cases of newly vaccinated puppies contracting a virus. These antibody levels can drop to low levels at different stages of the puppies first couple of weeks of life, so care must be taken and you should not rely on them to protect the puppy from virus’.

In order for your dachshund to limit the risk of viruses you must have them vaccinated. The C3 injectable vaccination protects your dachshund from parvo virus, distemper and hepatitis. The C5 (injectable or intranasal) vaccination protects your dachshund from parvo virus, distemper, hepatitis, para influenza virus and bordatella bronchiseptica (kennel cough).

The general vaccination protocol is as follows-

1st Vaccination: 6-8 weeks
2nd Vaccination: 10-12 weeks (C5 generally given at 2nd puppy vaccination, and then a yearly booster) *
3rd Vaccination: 16 weeks

* Adequate vaccination coverage does not begin until 2 weeks after your puppies 2nd vaccination, therefore you should not take them off your property or have them meet any other dogs until this time. Strict we know, but better to be safe than sorry.

Once your dachshund reaches 1 year of age a booster vaccination is required. Depending on the type of C3 vaccine used, this booster, and all C3 vaccinations given after, will last from 1 year, to 3 years. The kennel cough component of the C5 generally lasts for 1 year requiring boosters. Although it may seem frustrating that the KC vaccination booster is yearly, this allows your vet to perform an annual health check which can reveal any underlying issues in a seemingly healthy dachshund. Remember, our little long dogs age up to 7 years faster than we do, therefore regular health checks are important. If your dachshund is an adult and has never had a vaccination before, your vet will discuss with you an appropriate vaccination schedule taking in to account their age, and health status.

Always ask your vet the length of coverage their vaccination provides and it is a great idea to request a vaccination certificate for your dachshund’s records. Vets know that following a prompt vaccination schedule is very important and most hospitals will have a ‘reminders’ service, which can come in the form of mail, phone call, sms or email, to let you know your pets vaccinations are almost due. Ensure your dachshund is on this service and all contact details are up to date.

Vaccinations are the best form of protection, but if your dachshund has an acute or chronic illness/disease, or is on any immune suppressing medication, always consult your veterinarian.

 

 

What diseases should my dachshund be vaccinated against?

There are 4 main diseases/virus’ that all dachshunds should be vaccinated against, via 2 vaccinations, these are:

1. Canine Parvo Virus

Parvo virus (parvo for short) is an extremely highly infectious viral disease, which if left untreated in non vaccinated puppies and seniors,has an 80% fatality rate. Parvo virus attacks the gastro intestinal tract, but in severe cases can affect the bone marrow cells and the cardio vascular system by damaging the myocardium (muscle cells of the heart).

Parvo is spread through faeces which are infected with the virus. The infected faeces are then directly or non directly transmitted through the oral cavity. Remember, dachshunds investigate with their nose and mouth. This makes parvo virus extremely easy to pass from one dog to another.

What makes parvo virus so easily contractible is its ability to live in the environment once exposed for up to 1-2 years. It can live on the ground, rain, hail or shine, and the only way to kill the virus on inanimate objects are heavy duty disinfectants such as bleach.
Parvo virus does not discriminate with locations; it can live anywhere, at anytime.
* Parvo symptoms

– Dehydration
– Lethargy
– Anorexia
– Depression
– Swollen/painful abdomen
– Bloody diarrhoea
– Vomiting
– Hypothermia
– Dry nose and tongue
– Weight loss

* Treatment

If you suspect your dachshund has parvo virus, seek veterinary treatment immediately. Your vet will discuss with you your dachshunds vaccination and medical history to ensure they receive the most effective treatment.

Parvo virus can be diagnosed using in house diagnostic tests which include (but are not limited to) a faecal antigen test, blood profile and a physical examination. If your dachshund is diagnosed with parvo virus, your vet will admit them into hospital isolation so that no other patients can become infected. Upon admission, your vet will begin supportive therapy as your dachshunds immune system has been compromised. Supportive therapy may include intravenous fluid therapy (with added electrolytes), anti emetic medication (to stop vomiting), antibiotics (to treat any secondary infections), gastro intestinal protectants, and in severe cases, micro enteral nutrition and blood transfusions.

Once your dachshund’s condition improves, small amounts of water and prescription food will be gradually reintroduced as long as the gastro intestinal tract is functioning by absorbing the nutrients.

It is important to remember that canine parvo virus has a high fatality rate and no dachshund is completely immune. Therefore strict vaccination scheduling is vital and if your dachshund shows any of the above symptoms, seek veterinary advice immediately.

2. Infectious Canine Hepatits

Canine hepatitis is a highly contagious disease with high fatality numbers in puppies. Hepatitis is caused by the adrenovirus and attacks the patients liver. Hepatitis is spread via bodily fluids- urine, faeces and saliva from infected dogs. It is important to know that an infected dog can spread the virus up to 6 months post treatment. (Remember what we said about that ‘healthy’ neighbourhood dog who wanders in to your yard?).

* Hepatitis symptoms

– Fever
– Depression
– Diarrhoea
– Inappetance
– Lethargy
– Excessive drinking
– Vomiting
– Tonsilitis
– Swollen/painful abdomen
– Corneal clouding (post infection)

* Treatment

If you suspect your dachshund has hepatitis, you must seek veterinary attention immediately. The vet will discuss with you your dachshunds vaccination and medical history to ensure they receive the most effective treatment.

If your dachshund is diagnosed with hepatitis, your vet will admit them into hospital isolation so that no other patients can become infected. Upon admission, your vet will begin supportive therapy as your dachshunds immune system has been compromised. Supportive therapy may include intravenous fluid therapy (with added electrolytes), anti emetic medication (to stop vomiting), antibiotics (to treat any secondary infections), gastro intestinal protectants and in severe cases, micro enteral nutrition, pain relief and blood transfusions.
The effects of hepatitis can be with your dachshund for the rest of their life- so believe us when we say, prevention is better than the cure.

3. Distemper

Canine distemper is a highly contagious viral disease which can have devastating effects on your dachshunds respiratory and nervous system.
Distemper can be spread via multiple ways making it that much more contagious. It can be spread via airborne or direct exposure of infected bodily fluids (sneezing, sharing food bowls, during birth from mother to puppies). Distemper can even be carried via wildlife (foxes/ferrets), so even isolated communities need to ensure their dachshunds vaccinations are up to date.

* Distemper symptoms

– Fever
– Depression
– Diarrhoea
– Vomiting
– Lethargy
– Inappetance
– Coughing
– Discharge from nose, mouth and eyes
– Muscle spasms
– Convulsions
– Disorientation
– Head tilt
– Partial or complete paralysis

There is a high fatality rate from distemper. If a patient survives severe and permanent damage will have been caused. Life long effects can include thickened/hardened foot pads, compromised immune system, and brain damage.

* Treatment

If you suspect your dachshund has distemper, you must seek veterinary attention immediately. The vet will discuss with you your dachshunds vaccination and medical history to ensure they receive the most effective treatment.
If your dachshund is diagnosed with distemper, your vet will admit them into hospital isolation so that no other patients can become infected. Upon admission, your vet will begin supportive therapy as your dachshunds immune system has been compromised. Supportive therapy may include intravenous fluid therapy (with added electrolytes), anti emetic medication (to stop vomiting), antibiotics (to treat any secondary infections), gastro intestinal protectants and pain relief.

4. Kennel Cough

Kennel cough is a highly contagious disease which effects your dachshunds respiratory system. Kennel cough thrives in high traffic areas for dogs. Kennel cough is often present at dog parks, animal shelters, grooming facilities, pet shops, dog shows- you name it, and its there!
Kennel cough is primarily made up of 2 illnesses- Parainfluenza virus and Bordatella bronchiseptica. It is spread via infected airbourne particles (direct/indirect eg shared toys or bowls). These particles are then inhaled by your dachshund lining their respiratory tract and causing a persistent ‘dry hacking’ cough. Kennel cough infections can range from mild to life threatening, so vaccination vigilance is important.

* Kennel Cough symptoms
– Fever
– Inappetance
– Lethargy
– Dry cough (can become more present when pressure is applied to throat, during exercise or excitement)
– Difficulty breathing
– Nasal discharge
– Pneumonia

Effects of kennel cough, such as a dry cough may persist months following treatment due to the damage caused.

* Treatment

If you suspect your dachshund has kennel cough, you must seek veterinary attention. The vet will discuss with you your dachshunds vaccination and medical history to ensure they receive the most effective treatment.
If your dachshund is diagnosed with kennel cough (depending on the severity), your vet will prescribe supportive medications, such as antibiotics and cough syrup (to soften your dachshunds mucous membranes). Your dachshund must be kept isolated from other dogs (especially puppies and unvaccinated dogs) for 2 weeks, post treatment.

In severe cases (such as pneumonia) your dachshund may be admitted to isolation, for x rays, hospitalisation, blood tests and further treatments.

Some not so common diseases, such as Leptospirosis and Corona virus, do have preventative vaccinations. These vaccinations are not commonly administered as a general preventative health protocol, but if your veterinarian suspects your dachshund is at high risk, these vaccinations should be considered.

 

 

What will happen during a vaccination consultation with my veterinarian?

Regardless of whether this is your dachshunds first vaccination, or booster vaccination, your veterinarian will perform a physical health examination which will include checking your dachshunds temperature, heart rate, pulse rate, weight and ensure there is no inflammation or discharge coming from their eyes, ears, nose and mouth. While this is being performed, they will ask you questions regarding their general health, eating, drinking and toileting habits, and any other concerns you may have about your dachshund (lumps, behavioural issues ect).

Vaccinations may be administered 2 ways- subcutaneous injection between the shoulder blades, or intranasally (kennel cough).

Todays vaccinations are conveniently multi protectants, containing up to 3 components in 1 vial. This will depend on vaccination manufacturers, and which vaccine your veterinarian provides.

Kennel cough vaccines are generally administered intranasally as this is a rapid route of administration and stimulates antibodies formulation on the respiratory tract much quicker than subcutaneously,and can neutrolize any present current dormant infection.

Following vaccination, you should receive a vaccination certificate, with your dachshunds next vaccination date for your records.

 

 

Will my dachshund become sick following a vaccination?

Given that a vaccines purpose is to stimulate the immune system, minimal side effects may occur, although this is rare. Vaccines are incredibly safe for your dachshund but much like human vaccines, slight local discomfort such as swelling (where vaccination was injected) can occur. This should go down within 48 hours. While extremely rare, hypersensitivity to a vaccine (similar to anaphylactic reaction in humans), must be brought to your veterinarians attention immediately.

Please remember to keep these highly contagious and life threatening diseases out of our communities, with up to date vaccinating, to ensure your beloved dachshund is always protected. If you suspect your dachshund is suffering from any of the above diseases/virus isolate your dachshund from any other dogs and seek veterinary attention immediately.

Dachshund Health: Parvo Virus And Your Dachshund

At Dachshund Rescue Australia we write these health articles to bring awareness and education to all of our wonderful followers and their dachshunds (and of course, all other non long dog varieties). Throughout these articles we sometimes incorporate a few light hearted quips to show that caring for a dachshund is not all “NO, NO, NO and DONT, DONT DONT!”. Unfortunately, the topic of canine parvo virus is nothing but serious and without the right knowledge, can prove to be life threatening.

Canine parvo virus (parvo for short) is an extremely highly infectious viral disease, which if left untreated in non vaccinated puppies and seniors,has an 80% fatality rate. Parvo virus attacks the gastro intestinal tract, but in severe cases, can affect the bone marrow cells and the cardio vascular system by damaging the myocardium (muscle cells of the heart).

One of the reasons parvo virus can be so devastating, is that most of the time it can prevented using the correct vaccination and isolation protocols. In saying that, vaccinations do not provide 100% protection but provide a controlled resistance to the virus. Even if your dachshund is vaccinated, you should keep them away from any dog suspected of having parvo virus.

HOW IS CANINE PARVO VIRUS SPREAD?

Parvo is spread through faeces which are infected with the virus. The infected faeces are then directly or non directly transmitted through the oral cavity. Remember, dachshunds investigate with their nose and mouth. This makes parvo virus extremely easy to pass from one dog to another.

What makes parvo virus so easily contractible is its ability to live in the environment once exposed for up to 1-2 years. It can live on the ground, rain, hail or shine, and the only way to kill the virus on inanimate objects are heavy duty disinfectants such as bleach.
Parvo virus does not discriminate with locations; it can live anywhere, at anytime.

While you may feel that your area is safe, all it would take if got an infected dog to pass by,(I think this should read – while you may feel that you area is safe, all it would take is an infected dog to pass by) and your dachshund is at risk. Infected dogs may not show any signs of being sick for 1-2 weeks, and have a 5-12 day active faecal shedding time. Therefore an infected dog can transmit the virus before showing clinical signs. So that friendly neighbourhood stray dog may look healthy, but may actually be infected. As the virus can live for so long in the environment, you wouldn’t even need your dachshund to come in to contact with an infected dog. You could bring the virus in to your home via your shoes.

Believe us when we say, it is truly not worth the risk. There have been cases of backyard breeders having parvo virus living active in their homes, even puppies becoming infected from travelling interstate on planes that have transported an infected puppy from a backyard breeder.

Parvo virus is one of the most contagious canine viruses and you must do all that you can to stop your dachshund being at risk of becoming infected.

VACCINATIONS

When your dachshund was born, their mother’s milk provided them with maternal anti bodies which help protect the puppies from contracting parvo virus. This is one of the reasons puppies are not vaccinated immediately. These anti bodies, if present when vaccinated, can ‘cancel out’ the vaccination even at low levels, which is unfortunately why there are cases of newly vaccinated puppies contracting the virus. These antibody levels can drop to low levels at different stages of the puppies first couple of weeks of life, so care must be taken and you should not rely on them to protect the puppy from parvo.

In order for your dachshund to limit the risk of parvo you must have them vaccinated. The C3 injectable vaccination protects your dachshund from parvo virus, distemper and hepatitis. The general vaccination protocol is as follows-

1st Vaccination: 6-8 weeks
2nd Vaccination: 10-12 weeks *
3rd Vaccination: 16 weeks

* Adequate vaccination coverage does not begin until 2 weeks after your puppies 2nd vaccination, therefore you should not take them off your property or have them meet any other dogs until this time. Strict we know, but better to be safe than sorry.

Once your dachshund reaches 1 year of age, a booster vaccination is required. Depending on the type of C3 vaccine used, this booster, and all C3 vaccinations given after, will last from 1 year, to 3 years. Always ask your vet the length of coverage their vaccination provides and it is a great idea to request a vaccination certificate for your dachshund’s records. Vets know that following a prompt vaccination schedule is very important and most hospitals will have a ‘reminders’ service, which can come in the form of mail, phone call, sms or email, to let you know your pets vaccinations are almost due. Ensure your dachshund is on this service and all contact details are up to date.

Vaccinations are the best form of protection, but if your dachshund has an acute or chronic illness/disease, or is on any immune suppressing medication, always consult your veterinarian.

SYMPTOMS

Given the devastating and aggressive effects parvio virus can have on your dachshund, it is common belief that as soon as the virus has been contracted, symptoms will arise. Unfortunately your dachshund may not show symptoms for 2 weeks after being exposed to the virus. This can make it even more difficult when trying to determine how or where they contracted the virus. The following are parvo virus symptoms:

– Dehydration
– Lethargy
– Anorexia
– Depression
– Swollen/painful abdomen
– Bloody diarrhoea
– Vomiting
– Hypothermia
– Dry nose and tongue
– Weight loss

It is vital that owners are aware that once these dangerous symptoms begin, your dachshund requires urgent veterinary attention, as these symptoms can be life threatening.

TREATMENT

If you suspect your dachshund has parvo virus, seek veterinary treatment immediately. Your vet will discuss with you your dachshunds vaccination and medical history, to ensure they receive the most effective treatment.

Parvo virus can be diagnosed using in house diagnostic tests which include (but are not limited to) a faecal antigen test, blood profile and a physical examination. If your dachshund is diagnosed with parvo virus, your vet will admit them into hospital isolation so that no other patients can become infected. Upon admission, your vet will begin supportive therapy as your dachshunds immune system has been compromised. Supportive therapy may include intravenous fluid therapy (with added electrolytes), anti emetic medication (to stop vomiting), antibiotics (to treat any secondary infections), gastro intestinal protectants, and in severe cases, micro enteral nutrition and blood transfusions.

Once your dachshund’s condition improves, small amounts of water and prescription food will be gradually reintroduced as long as the gastro intestinal tract is functioning by absorbing the nutrients.

It is important to remember that canine parvo virus has a high fatality rate, and no dachshund is completely immune. Therefore strict vaccination scheduling is vital, and if your dachshund shows any of the above symptoms, seek veterinary advice immediately.

Dachshund Health: Dental Health

 

Dental Health And Your Dachshund By Hannah Prime

You walk in to the bright room, that familiar smell hits you as soon as you walk through the door, the sound of buzzing which haunts you in your sleep, your palms begin to sweat, and so begins the bargaining.. You are not in a horror movie, you’re at the dentist! We all know the importance of preventative dental care, and how dental problems can not only cause uncomfort and pain in the mouth, but can be a sign of more serious health issues. Dental health should not be limited to your two legged family, but to your dachshund as well. Like dentists say- prevention is the most important step. Understanding dental health, and symptoms to look out for, could be the difference between a simple scale and polish, your dachshund spitting their dentures out when they blow out the candles on their birthday pupcakes, or to more devastating results.

 

So what is dental disease?

Alarmingly, periodontal disease (an infection of the ‘periodontium’, or tissues surrounding your dogs teeth which is caused by bacteria) is one of the biggest health issues in our pets today. A staggering 80% of dogs will suffer from dental disease by their 3rd birthday. Dental disease does not just cause bad breath, it can cause inflammation, infection, and has even been linked to health issues such as diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. The most important thing to remember about dental disease is that it can usually be prevented, with good dental hygiene, a nutritious diet and regular veterinary check ups. In certain breeds, overcrowding of teeth can cause dental disease- dachshunds are amongst the small breeds most susceptible of dental disease, this means their mouth cavity does not have enough room to house the 42 teeth they will grow after losing their deciduous teeth, which should have fallen out from 3 months of age. If these teeth have not fallen out, your vet can remove them when you have your dachshund desexed (usually around 6 months of age).
One of the biggest tell tale signs your dachshund is suffering from periodontal disease is gingivitis. Gingivitis is the inflammation of the gums, which can cause them to become bright red, swollen and bleed when your dachshund is eating or chewing their toy. While it may be the first symptom, it can mean that your dachshund requires dental treatment sooner than you think. Gingivitis can be solved by regular brushing and flossing in humans, but as most dachshunds aren’t as cooperative when it comes to flossing time, gingivitis can quickly escalate into further dental disease. Gingivitis can be caused by leftover food, which has become caught in your dachshunds teeth, causing bacteria to grow, which then turns in to plaque (a film persay of bacteria, which covers the tooth). Over time, this film hardens, turning it in to tartar. Tartar is much harder to remove, and cannot be done yourself, as it attaches itself to an infected tooth so much so, that it can become a ‘wedge’ between the infected gum, and the tooth. Depending on what stage of periodontal disease your dachshund is suffering from, will depend on whether the infected teeth will survive. In many cases, the true extent of damage cannot be seen by the naked eye, but by radiographs, and general anaesthetic. Not only is periodontal disease uncomfortable and painful, it can open the gate to other illness’, as your dachshunds immune system is fighting hard to beat this infection, it can become compromised.

 

What are some of the causes of periodontal disease?

  • Breed
  • Overcrowding and misalignment of teeth
  • Diet
  • Chewing behaviours (how and what they chew)
  • Over grooming (large amount of hair in the oral cavity can promote bacteria)
  • Excessive panting (open mouth breathing can promote bacteria- always ensure this is a behaviour, and they’re not trying to cool themselves down, or they could be at risk of heat stroke)
  • Lack of oral hygiene (manual brushing)
  • Age

 

What are the signs of periodontal disease?

  • Bad breath
  • Reluctance to eat/chew
  • Loss of appetite
  • Excessive drooling
  • Blood in their saliva/bowl/on their toys
  • Agitated or depressed attitude
  • Rubbing their face
  • Swollen gums
  • Yellow casings over their teeth
  • Pus present in their mouth/on their teeth
  • Swollen face
  • Nasal discharge
  • Wobbly tooth
  • Loss of tooth

Periodontal disease is not only catagorised by swollen gums and rotted teeth. It can cause very serious dental problems, which need to be treated immediately, such as:

  • Abscess or fistulas, which can lead to the nasal cavity
  • Bone infections
  • Jaw fractures (causes by disintegration of the jaw bone)

 

Provide your dachshund with the following, and with your help, they can reduce the risk of periodontal disease, and live their life with a mouth of pearly whites. REMEMBER, prevention is the best form of combat when it comes to dental disease.

 

  • Brush brush brush: One of the most effective ways to prevent dental disease is to brush your dachshunds teeth. This is best started at a young age, so that they can grow used to it. Each time you brush their teeth, you should use positive reinforcement, to teach them that this is an enjoyable experience. There are special dog friendly ‘finger brushes’ on the market, which are perfect for a dachshunds small mouth. You can even buy doggy toothpaste, which can come in all kinds of flavours e.g beef, chicken and cheese! DO NOT use human toothpaste, as many ingredients are poisonous to dogs (fluoride). If you have never brushed your dachshunds teeth before, you can start slowly and gradually, in order for them to get used to it. Start by covering your finger in something appealing to them (e.g beef stock), and gently rubbing their teeth with your finger. Do this once daily, until they are comfortable with it. Then you can gradually introduce a finger brush, which has been dipped in beef stock, and gently move the finger brush over your dachshunds teeth in a circular motion. Finally, when they are happy with this routine, you can introduce the dog friendly toothpaste. Unfortunately, brushing is their limit. They are not open to flossing!
  • Nutritious diet: Feed your dachshund high quality dog foods, as this can be detrimental to their dental health. Dry dog foods are more effective in removing plaque from your dachshunds teeth, as they are used as an ‘abrasive’, each time they crunch the kibble. The higher amount of chewing the dry food will increase saliva production, and gum stimulation, as opposed to wet food. There are ‘dental health’ targeted dog food products on the market, but you should always consult your veterinarian about which is the most suitable for your dachshund. Including raw bones in your dachshunds diet is a great idea, but you must never give them cooked bones, as they can splinter, causing very serious problems.
  • Dental chews: Daily dental chews can aid in the destruction of plaque and tartar, while stimulating the gums. Although, they should be used as a ‘treat’, to ensure that your dachshund does not go over their daily feeding limit.
  • Regular veterinary examinations: Depending on your dachshunds age, 6-12 month check ups are advised. If your dachshund is suffering periodontal disease, the earlier it is treated, the better. Your vet can determine whether there are any underlying problems present. Treatment may come in the form of dental preventative medications (e.g supplements to aid in healthy mouth activity) , antibiotics, or a dental procedure under general anaesthetic.
  • Stop damaging habits: Ensure your dachshund does not partake in any dangerous habits, which can cause problems to their dental health, and themselves. Damaging habits can include chewing stones, pebbles, sticks or any other hard objects, as these can cause the teeth to wear down, or become lodged in their airways.

Dachshund Health: Garden Dangers

Gardening Dangers By Hannah Prime

It is no secret that dachshunds are an inquisitive breed. They are not ones to shy away from investigating their surroundings. The problem being that they generally use their nose or mouths to perform these important investigations. Your garden can harbour all sorts of dangers to your dachshund- these include poisonous plants, fertilizers, tree/fruit stones, insecticides, snail bait and rat bait.
In order to protect your dachshund from these threats, your best form of defence is awareness and prevention. Below are the different gardening dangers to your dachshund, and helpful tips to help your inspector sausage!

Poisonous Plants

The following are plants that can be commonly found in an Australian backyard, along with the toxic effects they can have on your dachshund.

– Aloe Vera– Commonly used to treat burns, but be aware it is toxic to your dachshund. Symptoms can include vomiting, depression, discolouration of urine and muscle tremours.
– Amaryllis– The bulbs are the most toxic component to this plant. Symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhoea, hyper salivation, lethargy, muscle tremours, anorexia and severe pain when the abdomen is touched.
– Autumn Crocus – Highly toxic plant. Symptoms can include vomiting (blood may be present), diarrhoea, shock, inability to regulate body temperature and bone marrow suppression.
– Azalea/Rhododendron – This plant can severely disrupt cardiac function, which can result in a coma, or even death. Initial symptoms can include hyper salivation, vomiting, diarrhoea, depression of the central nervous system and lethargy.
– Brunfelsia/ Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow– Very poisonous, especially in puppies. If your dachshund ingests this plant (along with the fruit that follows the flowering stage), it can be fatal. Symptoms can include vomiting, fever, muscle tremours, seizures and paralysis.
– Chrysanthemum– A naturally occurring pesticide, toxic to your dachshund. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhoea, hyper salivation, wobbliness and lethargy.
– Cyclamen – A very toxic plant which can result in death if ingested, the roots especially. Symptoms can include persistent vomiting, diarrhoea, seizures and cardiac dysfunction.
– Daffodils – The bulb especially. Symptoms can include diarrhoea, vomiting, wobbliness, loss of consciousness, coma and even death.
– English Ivy – A plant that is toxic through the leaves, along with the berries. Symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhoea, hyper salivation and pain in the abdomen, which can be detected by your dachshund hunching, or upon touch.
– Holly – Highly toxic berries, which can be fatal if only a small amount is digested by even large dogs. Imagine the effects they could have on your dachshund. Symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhoea, painful abdomen, wobbliness, loss of consciousness, coma and death.
– Hydrangea -This dangerous flower effects the gastro intestinal functions in your dachshund. Symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhoea, dehydration and lethargy.
– Lillies– The entire plant is toxic, not only to your dachshund but especially to cats. Symptoms can include vomiting, inappetence, depression and a lack of urination, as it attacks the kidneys.
– Madagascar Jasmine – The seed pods of this plant are especially dangerous.
– Nightshade – Toxicity comes from the berries and leaves. Symptoms can include vomiting, painful abdomen, wobbliness, muscle tremours, respiratory distress and cardiac failure.
– Oleander – Every part of this plant is toxic to your dachshund. Symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhoea, wobbliness, inability to breathe properly, seizures, inability to regulate body temperature and cardiac dysfunction which can lead to death.
– Philodendron – This plant can incur mild to severe effects on your dachshund if ingested. Symptoms can include vomiting, inappetence, swelling of the face, foaming of the mouth and respiratory difficulties.
– Sago Palm– The Sago Palm is so dangerous, that all it takes is a couple of seeds to be swallowed for it to have damaging effects on your dachshund. Symptoms can include gastro intestinal problems such as vomiting, diarrhoea, liver failure (causing a yellow discolouration of the skin and mucous membranes) seizures and blood in the faeces.
– Tulip – Be especially careful of the bulb, as this part contains the most toxins. Symptoms can include gastro intestinal problems such as vomiting, diarrhoea, hyper salivation, inappetence, convulsions and cardiac dysfunction.
– Wandering Jew – A very persistent weed that can be very difficult to remove. It causes an allergic reaction, most commonly on your dachshunds stomach, as these low riders are so close to the ground. It can be impossible for them not to come in to contact with it. It can also effect the elbows, chin and groin areas. The rash caused by Wandering Jew can later manifest in to very sore calluses, due to incessant scratching, which in turn can lead to bacterial infections.
– Wisteria – Symptoms can include vomiting (blood may be present), diarrhoea and depression.
– Yellow Oleander – Symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhoea and decreased heart rate.
– Yew – This toxic plant has been known to result in death after ingestion. Symptoms can include vomiting, muscle tremours, seizures, inability to breathe, wobbliness and finally heart failure.

If your backyard contains any of the above poisonous plants, you should remove them with appropriate spray (ensuring your dachshund cannot access this also), or by hand. If this is not possible, you should make the area inaccessible to your dachshund. If your dachshund ingests, or comes in to contact with any of these dangerous plants, you should remove any remaining plant from their mouth, take a sample of the plant and take your dachshund to your local veterinarian immediately, even if no symptoms have become present.

Fertilizers

After you have removed the toxic plants which are dangerous to your dachshund, its time to plant some pet friendly flowers, with the assistance of fertilizer. But just when you thought the hard part was over, you must now ensure that your fertilizer is pet friendly, and will in no way harm your dachshund. Fertilizers are known to contain nitrogen phosphorous and potassium elements. The natural compounds are not the danger. The danger lies with the additives, such as insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, copper and zinc. Ingestion of fertilizers can have mild to severe damaging effects, depending on the quantity your dachshund has eaten. A dachshund that has eaten some grass, which has come in to contact with a fertilizer will be in much less danger, than one that has discovered a whole bag of fertilizer and ingested large amounts.

That being said, you must always keep fertilizer (even pet friendly products) in an inaccessible area for your dachshund. Symptoms of fertilization poisoning can include:

– Vomiting
– Diarrhoea (blood may be present)
– Abdominal pain
– Hyper salivation
– Lethargy
– Collapsing
– Seizures
– Muscle tremours
– Laboured breathing
– Death

If your dachshund has ingested a fertilizer, take them and the brand of fertilizer to your local veterinarian immediately. If you must use fertilizers, there are brands available which are pet friendly. Although you should never have your dachshund out and about when applying the fertilizer, for at least 72 hours after, and ensure they do not have access to where the fertilizer is stored.

Compost And Fruit Stone Plants

You should never allow your dachshund to have access to any compost heaps, or fruit stone plants, as these can cause gastro intestinal obstructions, which can lead to serious health problems. Not only obstructions, but some fruits are toxic to dogs, such as cherries, apricots, peaches, plums and nectarines. One thing most dachshunds have is an insatiable appetite. They do not realise that the delicious half eaten corn cob in the compost heap, or the peach stone from a tree, could result in a major surgery or even fatality.
Symptoms of a gastro intestinal obstruction can include

– Vomiting (blood may be present)
– Inappetence
– Diarrhoea
– Abdominal pain
– Weight loss
– Lethargy/weakness
– Dehydration
– Constipation
– Gagging
– Excessive grass eating (this is a behaviour performed by dogs to induce vomiting)
– Aggression/seclusion due to pain
– Blood in stools

Gastro intestinal obstructions can be life threatening quickly, with some conditions deteriorating over time. If your dachshund has ingested anything other than food, you should take them to your local veterinarian immediately, as the sooner they are treated, the less damage (short and long term) the obstruction can cause.

Poisonous Baits

The two most commonly found poisonous baits that can be found in the average garden are rat bait and snail bait. These poison do not discriminate, and will harm whatever species has ingested them. It is of upmost importance that if you simply must use these products, you CANNOT put them (pellets and the box) anywhere that is accessible to your dachshund. This does not mean on the top shelf in the garage, where your dachshund frequents (if you have a rodent problem, who is to say they wont knock the box off the shelf while they scurry passed), in the cupboard in the laundry (doors can be accidently left open) or anywhere with the slight possibility of having access to. If a dachshund wants something, they will perform tricks that belong  in Cirque Du Soleil to get it.
The best way to prevent any poisoning to your dachshund is to avoid having the products on your property at all. Unfortunately in some poisoning cases presented to veterinary hospitals, it is not in fact the owners bait that their pet has ingested, but a cruel stranger, or neighbour who has provided the bait.
Because of this, even if you do not use poisonous baits, it is a great idea to be aware of poisoning symptoms. Remember, efficient timing can save your dachshunds life.

Rodent Bait

Rat bait generally comes in the form of pellets, which often resemble the appearance of many dry kibble products on the market for dog food, so it is no wonder your dachshund can be lured in to having a taste. There are many different rodenticides available, but you will find the majority contain an ingredient called ‘Warfarin’ or ‘Brodifacoum’. Rat bait acts as an anticoagulant, in other words, it binds the Vitamin K factor in the blood, causing the blood to be unable to clot. As soon as the bait has been ingested, the Vitamin K will begin to deplete, this can take from hours, to days to show serious effects, but the longer it has been in your dachshunds system, the more it becomes life threatening. Essentially, the poisoning causes uncontrollable bleeding, internally and externally. Think about how clumsy dachshunds can be- a common bump or scratch can become very serious if the blood is not able to clot. It is not only the direct ingestion of the pellets that is a danger to your dachshund. If your dachshund eats a rat, which has been poisoned by rat bait, your dachshund is at risk of delayed toxicity. So it is a great idea to ask neighbours if they are ever planning on putting out rat bait, to inform you. A safer and humane way to remove rats are live traps, which can be checked daily, and relocate them.

Signs and symptoms of rat bait ingestion can include:
– Lethargy/weakness/depression
– Vomiting (blood may be present)
– Inappetence
– Diarrhoea
– Blood in urine
– Blood in stools
– Pale gums/inner eyelid
– Bruising (can be hard to detect due to fur)
– Nose bleeds
– Cold limbs
– Constant bleeding from even the smallest of wounds
– Laboured/rapid breathing
– Seizures
– Muscle tremours
– Death

If you see your dachshund ingesting rat bait, or suspect they have, you must take them straight to your local veterinarian (along with the box of rat bait, so that the vet can identify the ingredient and treat accordingly). Once at your vets, depending on how long ago it was since ingestion, they may induce vomiting. Further treatments can include a gastric lavage (stomach pump), activated charcoal for absorption of the bait, so that it does not go in to the system, blood tests to check clotting factors,  if your dachshund is anaemic, Vitamin K supplementation will be provided. In severe cases, IV fluids, blood/plasma transfusions and oxygen therapy may be required. Repeated blood tests will be necessary, and your vet will prescribe ongoing Vitamin K tablets until your dachshunds clotting factors have returned. This can take up to 3 weeks.

Snail Bait

Snail bait, much like rat bait usually comes in pellet form, which depending on the type, contains the active ingredients ‘Metaldehyde’, ‘Methiocarb’ or ‘Iron EDTA’. Not only do they resemble dry kibble, but the manufacturers try to tempt the nails by flavouring them with tasty ingredients such as apple, molasses, soybeans, rice and oats. How can you expect your dachshund to turn their nose up at these, when they have been known to eat faeces and even socks!

Though highly palatable, snail bait is toxic to your dachshund. Due to the different types of ingredients of snail bait, the symptoms can differ from brand to brand. If your dachshund shows any of the following symptoms, you should take them, and the box/brand of snail bait to your local veterinarian immediately, as only a small amount of ingested poison can be life threatening, very quickly.

Symptoms of snail bait poisoning can include:

– Hyper salivation
– Panting
– Wobbliness
– Disorientation/incoordination
– Muscle twitching/tremours
– Vomiting
– Rapid breathing/heart rate
– Hyperthermia
– Seizures
– Diarrhoea (blood may be present)
– Coma
– Death

Remember, if your dachshund has ingested, or you suspect they have ingested snail bait, take them and the box straight to your local veterinarian, as prolonged treatment can result in liver, heart and brain damage. Depending on the length of time since ingestion, the vet may induce vomiting. Further treatments can include gastric lavage (stomach pump), enema, activated charcoal to absorb the poison, muscle relaxants, anti seizure medication (if muscle tremours are occurring), supportive IV fluids and blood tests, to reveal any organ damage.

Whether it be a poisonous plant, gastric obstruction or bait poisoning, always see a veterinarian immediately, to give your curious sausage the best chance of recovery.

Dachshund Health: Ticks And Your Dachshund

Ticks And Your Dachshund by Hannah Prime

Paralysis ticks may be small, but the affects they can have on your dachshund can be enormous. Paralysis ticks are external parasites, that suck the blood of their hosts (marsupials, possums, cattle, horses, cats and dogs). Through which they can omit a potentially fatal toxin affecting the nervous system. Paralysis ticks can look different depending on whether they have fed and become engorged. They generally have a blue-ish grey colour to them. But this can be more difficult to distinguish when they are smaller than a piece of rice prior feeding.

People will generally associate ‘tick season’ with the summer months, although this is not true. Paralysis ticks can be found on your dachshund at any time of the year. Paralysis ticks are most prone to warm, bushy and humid areas of Australia. They love to linger in long grass- as this makes it very easy for them to attach themselves to your low riding dachshund. Imagine how close your dachshunds nose, ears, limbs and stomach are to the ground. All of the body parts ticks love to attach themselves to!

PREVENTION

Prevention is the best form of a cure when it comes to your dachshund and paralysis tick protection.

– Ensure your backyard is not a ‘tick paradise’ by keeping your lawn cut short and removing compost piles. Avoid walking your dachshund in these types of areas.

– Check your dachshund for ticks EVERYDAY. This should be a thorough search, using your fingertips, right down to your dogs skin. Ticks thrive in warm spots, so extra time should be taken around skin folds, underarms, groin, inside the ears, and under the lip skin. Although ticks have been found inbetween toes, the tail and anus. So a thorough whole body check is required everytime. Tick searches must be performed regardless of tick prevention products being used. Ticks can grow dramatically in size within a number of days, so a tick that was missed the previous day can stand out the next.

– Keeping your dachshunds coat short will aid in tick searches, and provide higher visibility.

 

PREVENTATIVE PRODUCTS

There are a number of tick preventative products on the market. Some are more suited and appropriate to certain lifestyles. To ensure your dachshunds highest chance of tick prevention, you should research each product, before deciding which is the product for you. Below are just a few of the most common and recommended tick preventative products available at your local veterinary clinic or pet shop.

– ‘Bravecto’ is a 3 monthly chewable, which helps protect your dachshund from paralysis ticks and fleas. It is highly palatable, and begins to work within 8 hours of administration. It can be given to puppies from 6 months of age, and they can swim or be bathed straight after. It comes in many sizes, and you only need to purchase 4 chewables for the whole year.

– ‘Nexgard’ is a beef flavoured chew, administered montly to protect your dachshund from paralysis ticks and fleas. It works within hours and can be given to puppies from 8 weeks of age. **Nexgard should not be given to dogs with a history of seizures. Contact your veterinarian to determine a suitable tick preventative for your dog**

– ‘Advantix’ is a 2 weekly spot on treatment to kill paralysis ticks and fleas. Advantix can be used in puppies from 7 weeks of age, and your dachshund can swim within 48 hours of administering the product. **Advantix is extremely poisonous to cats, and should not be used in households that have cats**

– ‘Scalibor’ tick collars are a 3 monthly collar, that are used to help protect against paralysis ticks. The collars are odourless, transfers through friction between your dachshunds skin, and is one size fits all. Puppies from 8 weeks of age are suitable to wear them. But be aware that the first collar applied will not become active for 2-3 weeks, so a further preventative product is required during this period.

– ‘Frontline Plus’ is a 2 weekly spot on treatment, applied between the shoulder blades. You must not wash or swim your dog until 48 hours after application. Puppies from 8 weeks of age may use this product. Frontline does not repel paralysis ticks, only affecting them once they feed on your dog. **NOTE- There have been many instances in which veterinary clinics have noticed Frontline Plus resistance in paralysis ticks throughout Australia. If this is the case in your area, you should trial another product, to see if it is more effective for your dachshund.

– ‘Frontline Spray’ is a topical spray to be used every 3 weeks. It can be used from 2 days of age, and helps protect your dachshund from paralysis ticks and fleas. Administration is by simply spraying your dachshunds body and rubbing it in (with gloves as it contains Isopropyl Alcohol). The amount of pumps required will depend on the weight of your dachshund (Eg 100ml bottle is 6 pumps/kgs).

You should not rely on these products, as no product is 100% effective. Instead they should be used WITH other preventative methods e.g daily tick searches.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU FIND A TICK ON YOUR DACHSHUND

Many believe that if you find a tick on your pet, you should leave it- this is NOT true. The longer the tick is attached to your pet, the more toxins it can secrete. Tick hooks are available from veterinary clinics and pet shops. This is the most reliable way to remove a tick, otherwise a ‘grip and twist’ motion can remove them. If the head is left attached, do not panic. The tick will die and be unable to inject more poison. It may leave the area swollen, much like a beesting. Your local vet will be able to treat this, when you take your dachshund to see them immediately after removal. Tick patients should always seek veterinary attention. You should never attempt to treat a tick envenomation yourself, as tick symptoms can be prolonged, but your dogs condition can deteriorate quickly. You may not always find a tick, but instead a ‘crater’ like wound in your pets skin. Even if a tick has detached, your dog can still suffer paralysis.

SYMPTOMS OF TICK PARALYSIS

EARLY STAGES
– Change in voice (barking, howling, whimpering) can become softer or muffled. This is the neurotoxin beginning to paralyse your dog.
– Weakness in the back legs, lethargy and/or limping.
– Vomiting (froth especially)
– Inappetance

MID STAGES
– Wobbliness of hind legs
– Excessive salivation
– Coughing
– Reluctance to stand/move at all
– Panting

LATER STAGES
– Total paralysis
– Exaggerated and laboured breathing
– Grey/blue gums
– Death

I HAVE FOUND A TICK ON MY DOG- WHAT SHOULD I DO?

Remove the tick, and keep your dog as calm as possible. Call your local veterinary clinic immediately and tell them you are on your way, that way they are able to prepare the appropriate equipment and medications prior to your arrival. On your way to the clinic, you should have someone continually searching for further paralysis ticks on your dachshund. The vet will assess your dogs condition. DO NOT give your dog any food or water. Due to paralysis effects, your dog may aspirate the food/water (inhale rather than swallow) causing severe breathing difficulties or aspiration pneumonia. Depending on your dogs condition your vet will administer tick anti serum, IV fluids, oxygen therapy, sedation to reduce excitement and stress which can worsen a tick patients condition, medication to reduce excessive salivation, anti emetics for vomiting, anti biotics for pneumonia risks, continued tick searching and total body clip if required.

** Any dachshund with paralysis/mobility problems should receive immediate veterinary treatment, as a precaution to IVDD **

RECOVERY

While in hospital, your dachshund will receive multiple tick searches daily, oxygen therapy if required, IV fluids for dehydration and vitamin supplementation and all necessary medications. Recovery has been known to take over 7 days. Discharge from hospital should not be rushed. Your dachshund should not return home until all vital signs are within normal limits, your dachshunds gag reflex has returned, they are able to walk and they are able to eat small meals. Taking note that every patients recovery is different, and may take longer. Always follow your veterinarians discharge instructions, and monitor your dachshund closely.

Dachshund Health: Introducing Your Baby To Your Dach Baby

Dachshunds are one of the most loving, loyal and charismatic breeds out in the doggy world. Unfortunately, nobody is perfect and with these desirable traits come a long dog sized list of traits which may or may not have reared their heads until you bring home a new fur-less addition to your family.

These traits can include separation anxiety, extreme neediness, stubbornness, dominance and a fondness for routine that if even 1 extra minute goes by, anyone would think it were the end of the world.

Unfortunately, research has shown that children between the ages of 0-4 years old are at the greatest risk of dog bites. Therefore if you’re about to be introducing your dachshund to a new addition to your family, you need to start preparations now to reduce the chances of any dog related injuries to your baby, your dachshund, or yourself.

In saying that, pets and children can form a special bond, which is one of the most heart warming things to witness. Pets and children share similarities; they both have a vulnerable, yet joyous outlook in life. Your dachshund will teach your child many things (good and sometimes mischievous!) such as the responsibility and care for another living being.

Babies VS dachshunds are one of the most common reasons for rehoming through Dachshund Rescue Australia so we have created a checklist which you can start before babies arrival, in order to ease the big bundle of transition for your whole family.

Prepare, prepare, prepare and did we mention prepare?

• Change is a word that will make any dachshund cringe. Take small steps to change what your dachshund is used to now rather than turn their whole world upside down in one go. This may include changes to their current feeding routine (a great habit to begin now is removing your dachshunds bowl from the floor when finished, as a baby crawling towards a dachshunds bowl is a recipe for disaster), sleeping routine, exercise routine and toileting routine (these areas will need to be inaccessible to baby in order to reduce the chances of zoonotic diseases). The more time your dachshund has to adjust to these new changes, the better.

• Block off any areas you may not want them to access now rather than down the track. Dachshunds are very observant, you do not want them to associate your new baby with their sudden lack of freedom. Baby gates are fantastic, as they may limit access, but they still allow visibility so your dachshund still feels included.

• If your dachshund has a ‘Yeah I sit.. when I want to sit’ approach to obedience, now is a fantastic time to teach them. It will help you to control situations in the future. The basics ‘sit, stay and drop’ are fine. If you’re having trouble we recommend taking your dachshund to obedience training.

• Your car is going to be getting a small makeover – babyseats. Your dachshund may need to play musical chairs when this has been fitted, so it is a great idea to move their travel system now to where you anticipate they will go.

• Set up your nursery as early as possible and introduce your dachshund to all of the new smells (baby oils, powder) sights (baby toys, swingers) and sounds (recordings of baby noises can be a great preparation) that will soon become part of their life.

• Be a baby! Gently poke and prod your dachshund as a baby would do. If they react positively, reward them with praise and a treat. Respect goes both ways- teach your child to be gentle and caring when it comes to your dachshund.

• Organise as if you’re about to go on an extended holiday. Ensure your dachshunds vaccinations, worming and all parasite preventions are up to date. Stock your house with your dachshunds food and/or medications and if need be, organise a pet sitter for when the big day arrives!

The stork has arrived!

• One of the most important things to remember when bringing home your bundle of joy to meet your dachshund of joy, is to remain calm and in control. Your dachshund will sense any anxiety you have. To ensure your dachshund and baby enjoy a great relationship, you want their initial meeting to be positive.

• When arriving home with your baby, have Mum walk in first, with babies blanket but without baby, as it may have been some time since they have seen you. Once your dachshund has calmed down (putting them on a lead may help), and smelt the baby blanket, have the other person bring baby in to the room. Unwrapping babies feet and allowing your dachshund to smell them will stop your dachshund being in the face of your baby, but allows them to use their primary sense of communication- smell.

• If your dachshund reacts positively, praise, treat and repeat! This is a huge step for your dachshund and it shouldn’t go ignored. Under no circumstances should you force your dachshund to meet your baby. If they aren’t comfortable stop and try another time, until their anxiety and stress declines. Having a ‘time out’ area for your dachshund allows them to retreat if the situation becomes overwhelming.

• Include, don’t exclude. As previously discussed, you do not want your dachshund to associate your new baby with their new found loneliness. Find some daily quality time for your dachshund (walks are perfect for quality time and tire them out reducing anxiety and energy), and when you’re busy with baby eg feeding time, ensure your dachshund is kept busy (kong filled with treats does the trick). Try not to fall in to the trap of only giving your dachshund attention when your baby is out of the room- they’re not silly!

• Feed baby before dachshund. This will show your dachshund that baby is ‘above’ them.

• Never leave your dachshund and baby alone together. Even the most trustworthy dog has their limits.

• There is absolutely NO shame in having to consult a behaviourist. This is a huge learning curve for all parties involved.

Love, love and more love. You want your dachshund to feel as loved now, as they did before baby ❤

Dachshund Health: 5 Foods Never To Feed Dogs

Dachshund Health: Is Your Dachshund A Healthy Weight?

Dachshund Meetup Groups

Useful Dachshund-related Links

IVDD / Disabled Dachshund

 

 

 

Dodgers List – for all information on dachshund back problems

www.dodgerslist.com/

 

Registered Breeders

For a full list of registered breeders in Australia

www.dogzonline.com.au

 

Dachshund Club of NSW

http://www.dachshundclub.org.au/

 

Dachshund Club of Qld

https://dcqnewsblog.com/

 

Dachshund Club of Victoria

http://www.dachshundaustralia.org.au/

 

Dachshund Club of W.A.

http://www.dogswest.com/dogswest/Clubs-Single_Breed_Clubs-Dachshund_Club_of_WA.htm

 

The National Dachshund Council

http://nationaldachshund.org.au/

 

Life with a Double Dapple Dachshund and other related information on double dapples

http://www.lifewithadoubledappledachshund.com/

 

Dachshund Sitting Group

This group is if you need a sitter for your dachshund and want to reach out to other dachshund owners around the country.  All sitting is between the person offering to sit and the person requesting the sit…i.e. it is your responsibility as to the suitability of the accommodation, dogs getting along etc.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/614459741942369/

 

Canine Cancer Org.

canine cancer

A website dedicated to the education of dog owners on canine cancer and supported by Australian oncologists

http://www.caninecancer.org.au

 

The Vinca Plant –  Highly toxic to your dog, please check it out.

http://bit.ly/1tHDFsg

Clipping Nails

The dreaded nail clipping session!  Starting off early when you first get your puppy will make the process a whole lot easier on you both and just become another part of their regular routine.  This slide show bought to you by Pet Place shows you where and how to clip.

http://www.petplace.com/picture-viewer.aspx?lid=402&imageIndex=0

 

Is the sun dangerous to your pet?

We all know how our dachshunds just love to lie in the sun but you should be aware that the sun can be harmful.  With summer shortly upon us its worth checking out this article, and of course Never leave your dachshunds in the car in summertime.

http://www.petplace.com/dogs/is-the-sun-dangerous-to-your-pet/page1.aspx

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World Dachshund Day – 22 June 2019

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